Archive for ‘Music’

Malt Infused Metal

Beer and Metal:  A savagely harmonious combination.  Not unlike peas and carrots.  Or masturbation and razor wire.  Or sex and nipple clamps attached to car batteries.

So, why not cultivate that vicious amalgamation into a metal bar that serves craft beer?  Well, a few Denver entrepreneurs did just that, opening a brewing company called TRVE, the bar rooted just south of downtown Denver on a bohemian stretch of asphalt called Broadway.

Slayer Sink

“Our goal is to give you a rad place to hang out and drink killer beer,” their website reads.  “ . . . our mission has always been to create beers that are beyond the pale. To us this implies new ideas, channeling Loki, and embracing chaos. It means drawing from the sounds and sights that inspire us most in life.”

They used the word rad.  How fucking rad is that?

I dropped by TRVE with some friends to drown my brain in more than a few heavenly hellishly fermented beverages (and only after, of course, we sacrificed a few humans to Loki).

I met an awesome barkeep named Shayna (sorry if spelling is off), who let me sample a few of TRVE’s brutal brews, including Grey Watcher—a Grisette-style farmhouse ale.  It had a strong sour taste that complemented the beer very nicely malevolently.

drinks

Next was a sample of Death Ripper—an amber(ish) ale.  Indeed the drink plunged into my stomach and ripped apart my dark soul, so I ordered 16 more ounces of that wonderfully fiendish refreshment.

As I was sipping away on my hops, I asked Shanya how she got into metal.  Shayna told me that when she was a wee-little kid, her mom would play Judas Priest records.

Shanya added that her mom recently battled cancer and was victorious.  In honor of her mom’s conquest, Shayna had the words Judas Priest tattooed on her arm, the letters in pink (the color for cancer awareness) outlined in black.

And it wasn’t long after our conversation that I heard Judas Priest’s “Between the Hammer and the Anvil” blasting out of the speakers above the bar as I gulped down the rest of my Death Ripper.

Being a Saturday night, the bar was packed with assorted groups of revelers.  There were (of course) small clusters of metalheads, but I also saw a small pack of punks, a few gaggles of “hipsters,” and even a faction of yuppies—all enjoying the solidarity of those who embrace beer and metal and human sacrifices to Loki.

dark

Normally I would feel tremendously uncomfortable sitting in a crowded bar, but Sepultura’s “Slave New World” calmly truncated  my apprehension.  I was even slamming my head forward a few times, careful not to knock over my brew, lest I be charged with alcohol abuse, dragged out behind the bar, and beaten to death with giant pixie sticks—as is the law in Denver.  (We take our beer very seriously in the Mile High City.)

Soon I was on my third (or fourth, or sixth) beer—this time an American stout called Stout O))).  And I mean this was a fucking STOUT.  The kind of beer you eat with a knife and a fork.  Thick as tree bark.  Impenetrably dark.  And a taste that makes you cum in your pants with the first sip bite.

It was when I was eating my stout that a black metal band out of Norway called Urgehal began trouncing TRVE denizens.  Songs from their album Goatcraft Torment tore out of the speakers and fed greedily off the beer-soaked flesh at the bar.

But the most savage facet of TRVE is their strong support for local talent.  Not only does the bar display local art on the walls, but the brewery collaborates with Flatline Audio, a Denver studio that churns out (among other music) metal.

art_crop“Recording time ain’t always cheap,” TRVE’s website reads.  “And there are killer bands out there fighting tooth and nail just to break even. We wanted to help these people out and get their music heard.”

That’s pretty fucking metal if you ask me.

The Denver band, Black Sheep of Kali, recorded two tracks through this collaboration.  You can download the songs for free at their Bandcamp page:  http://flatline.trvebrewing.com/album/judecca-morbus

So, if you ever end up in Denver for a metal show (or to legally buy some pot), definitely check out TRVE.  Just be sure you sacrifice a few humans to Loki before you walk in the door.

Metal as the Muse

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As an author, I listen to a wide variety of music while I write—from metal to electronic ambient  to classical music.  Camille Saint-Saëns’ Danse Macabre (Dance of Death) is one of my favorites.  The composition was inspired by one of Saint-Saëns’ own poems where death plays a violin at the stroke of midnight surrounded by skeletons dancing in their shrouds.  Pretty damn metal.

Chuck Palahniuk (author of Fight Club) once said in an interview that he prefers to draft novels in the waiting areas of emergency rooms, feeding off the noise and drama unfolding all around him.  Hemingway is often attributed with the quote: “Write drunk; edit sober,” which I often do in noisy bars downing pint after pint of fermented liquid happiness.  But several authors I work with can only pen the future great American masterpiece in complete silence.

For me, silence stifles my ability to write.  It’s deafening.  In truth, silence is really fucking distracting.  It opens the black iron gates to that cacophony of shrill voices in my mind that come crawling out of the obsidian that is my subconscious—their pointed fangs and claws flashing white in the darkness just before sinking deep into my trembling eyeballs.

And it’s not easy to write with bleeding eyeballs.

To quell that silence and keep those visceral voices at bay, I often use metal to mangle my imagination, hopefully resulting in a host of stories convulsing and bleeding on the floor with exquisite ingenuity.   And the bands I usually gravitate toward—like the Saint-Saens’ piece—feature a strong narrative quality throughout their albums.  

Moonsorrow is a great example and has always been a savage source of creative strength when I’m killing off fictional characters in innovative ways. (Usually involving Medieval weapons.  And lots of fire.)  The band’s thirty-minute magnum opus, “Tulimyrsky,” (from the EP which shares the same name) cultivates just the right amount of pagan black metal madness and macabre tranquility.

The song itself (translated as Firestorm) is a story of revenge:  The violent sacking of a village, homes burning brightly in the night, bodies riddled with arrows, axes and swords coated in crimson, screams drowning in waves of blood—all sung in Finnish. These narrative elements lend themselves to my own story lines and characters whose own internal battles often leave them slaughtered alongside piles of swirling ash.

Another band good for cultivating creativity is Xanthochroid, which I came across on metal-archives.com as a related band to Ne Obliviscaris.  Paralleling Portal of I (with the exception of that signature kick-ass violin), Xanthochroid’s album Blessed He With Boils similarly boasts melodic vocals juxtaposed nicely with growls.

There’s a folkish element to many of their songs, including a flute in “Winter’s End.”  An acoustic guitar drops in often throughout the album to lull your malleable mind into a false sense of security just before thrashing guitar riffs and high-pitched growls tear your head off your shoulders.  There is even a piano solo.

The album, which should be listened to in its entirety from start to finish, fosters a fantastic atmosphere of reflection, animosity, and anguish, the perfect scrim for my own fictional characters to play out their own hardships and miseries.

Caladan Brood‘s debut album Echoes of Battle offers yet another impressive metal conduit for those creative writing juices to bubble up to the surface.  With influences ranging from Tolkien to Moonsorrow to World of Warcraft, the band’s first album generates yet another rich atmosphere of black metal embedded deeply in fantasy folklore.

One particular song that tickles my testicles as I write (which is essential for any successful author) is the song “Wild Autumn Wind,” a melodic, slow-paced-yet-fiercely-energetic song, featuring the band’s signature choral vocals.

And then there’s that gorgeous guitar solo at 9:35 that just makes my head slam forward over and over, driving my fingers to type faster and harder.

And check out the lyrics to the song, “Book of the Fallen”

Strap on your shields and raise your banners. / Hear the call of raging battle. / Beneath a hail of flaming arrows. / Push ever forward. Never surrender.

I don’t think there’s ever been a more accurate description of the creative process put to song.

All of these albums share a common narrative theme: Vicissitude.  Peaks and valleys.  The dichotomy of those guttural screams clawing alongside clean vocals.  Gentle piano interludes and head-crushing blast beats.  Those all-too-human moments of empathy followed by furious eruptions of raw acrimony that burns the world black with soot.

I greedily feed off the talent and creativity of theses bands, and the albums parallel the very stories I try to write.  Conflict.  Loss.  Resolution.  Contemplation.  Retribution.  Death.  

Duality

“Why do you have to listen to it loudly?” my partner yelled, looking at me from the passenger seat, his face twisted into a tight knot.  I didn’t respond right away as the speakers in my truck pummeled out some random metal lunacy.  “I can’t hear myself think!” he pleaded.

“That’s the point!” I yelled back with a smile.  He didn’t he return the grin.  I then had to choose between turning the music down or sleeping in my truck.  It’s a good thing I keep a pillow in the cab.

But that really is the point.   Sometimes I just want to shut my mind off, and drinking a bottle of whiskey every day isn’t really an option (though I sometimes wish it were).

It’s metal that keeps me (somewhat) sane.  It certainly keeps me from lighting the mall on fire, laughing manically while I pour kerosene on my head in front of a burning Abercrombie & Fitch store surrounded by screaming shoppers choking on smoke and the smell of burnt flesh.

axeAnd when I worked customer service to put myself through college, metal kept me from bringing an axe to work and lopping off the heads of all those condescending customers—laughing manically while I did it, of course.

Metal is a bastion when you lose your job and find yourself selling your plasma to buy groceries.  It’s the grotto you climb into when you discover your girlfriend/boyfriend moved out, taking the computer and the dog.  Metal is what you listen to right before every family christmas dinner.

It’s something my partner (who listens to nothing but jazz and classical music) will never get.  Which is fine, as long as I keep a pillow in my truck.

And that’s not to say all metal is just one-dimensional  pulp vomited into your ears to drown  out your own depressing, strangling thoughts.  On the contrary, engaging lyrics can rip you out of your own stolid perspective.  Just read the lyrics to almost any Agalloch song.  And the samples in “Faustian Echoes” are wonderfully though provoking.

ImageFaust: “So, still I seek the force, the reason governing life’s flow and not just its external show.”
Mephistopheles: “The governing force? The reason? Some things cannot be known.  They are beyond your reach even when shown.”
Faust: “Why should that be so?”
Mephistopheles: “They lie outside the boundaries that words can address, and man can only grasp those thoughts which language can express.”
Faust: “What? Do you mean that words are greater yet than man?”
Mephistopheles: “Indeed they are.”
Faust: “Then what of longing? Affection?  Pain or grief? I can’t describe these, yet I know they are in my breast.  What are they?”
Mephistopheles: “Without substance, as mist is.”
Faust: “In that case man is only air as well!”

Metal isn’t afraid to claw away at that comfortable social veneer most people saturate themselves in—to reveal the horror of an unexamined life.

So, here are a few of my favorite metal songs that explore this duality.  They run the gamut from poetic music inspired by John Milton to raw animosity.  Listen as loud as possible.

Dying Fetus “Second Skin”  [intelligent growls]

“Gracious second skin
Courteous facade accepted
The cultured do not harm
Fitting in amongst the sheeple”

Hevein “Last Drop of Innocence” [the death of childhood with a cello and a violin]

Draconian “Expostulation / Heaven Laid in Tears”  [Paradise Lost as metal]

Agalloch “Not Unlike the Waves” [astronomy as metal]

Maldire: A Curse Wanting

It was shortly after one in the morning when I opened my laptop and made my way to the Metropolis website.  It was the 11th of September, and Velvet Acid Christ’s Maldire was just made available for purchase.  I hastily bought the album, along with the t-shirt that featured Quartier Macbre’s beautiful and gruesome artwork.  I clamped my headphones over my head and pushed play.

Wicked harmonies ensued.  Bryan’s curse was cast.  My ears bled.

I discovered the music of VAC in 1998 by happenchance in a used CD store in Utah (of all places).  I was flipping through a pile of CD cases when I came across Church of Acid.  The eye-catching artwork garnered my attention, so I pulled it out of the pile and listened to the disk in the store.  I was immediately enthralled.  Never before had I heard music that so accurately paralleled my own anger, isolation, and depression so elegantly—and with such intense malevolence.

I’ve been a fan ever since, following Bryan’s career and evolution with enthusiasm.

Maldire is an excellent throwback to some of his earlier work on Fun With Knives and Twisted Thought Generator, combined with a more experienced, developed sense of sound and structure that occupies Lust for Blood and The Art of Breaking Apart.

The album begins with an audio clip from the television series Dark Shadows, an ideal way to launch Maldire with the incantation of “charred and blackened clouds that reigned (or rained for the pun) at your beginning.”  Indeed the gloomy clouds gather thick and heavy as the track unfolds with weighty, thunderous beats that threaten to crack your skull, while layers of synths mercilessly pummel your ears.  Then Bryan’s booming vocals tunnel into your mind with the perfect amount of maliciousness.  By the end of the song, my own heart was scorched forever black by this blight evoked.

“Maldire” itself is one of the strongest songs on the album, with a powerful, captivating beat that forces your body to move to the music like a demon helplessly following Lucifer’s lurid commands.  The duality established by Bryan’s lyrics are intoxicating, and you can’t help but sing along, face distorted, eyes narrowed as you lament about casting spells and cutting your own flesh, frightening the patrons of the coffee shop who happen to be sitting next to you when “Maldire” starts playing in your headphones.

There are two instrumental songs, “Septic Rinse” and “HyperCurse.”  Bryan has a knack of juxtaposing buoyant trance tracks with thick layers of despondency that drip with obsidian.  Beauty eviscerated and sealed in black glass before being thrown to the ground, shattering into a million pieces that slice your bare feet.

“Dream Curse” consists of the album’s only spoken-word track.  Like being flung into an ethereal nightmare from which you can’t awake, narrated with images of melting faces, chattering bones and blood raining from the sky, threatening to drown you in ambivalence toward this world we inhabit.

Maldire is paradigm for electronic albums today, spiking high above the white noise of industrial music that has inundated the scene to the point that discovering anything unique or innovative is a chore, and a scarcity.

It’s the kind of album that, like the first time I listened to Church of Acid in that Utah music store, grabs you by the throat and tears out your vocal chords just to get your attention, then soothes you with evil melodies as you slowly bleed to death on the floor, unable to think of a better way to slip into oblivion.

Listen and buy Maldire from the Metropolis website here.  European denizens click here.  You’ll be cursed with deafness if you don’t.

The Dancing Dead in Denver

The Dancing Dead in Denver

After a 16 year hiatus, the talented and diverse group of musicians known as Dead Can Dance (DCD) returned with a much anticipated album entitled Anastasis, followed by a world tour.  On August 19, they played to a packed Buell Theater at the Denver Performing Arts Center.

ImageLead vocalists Lisa Gerrard and Brendan Perry formed the band thirty-one years ago in Melbourne, Australia.  Incorporating instruments from all over the world, the duo have crafted a plethora of albums that run the gamut of musical influences from Ireland to Africa to the Mediterranean to China.

But the real power behind DCD comes from the vocals of the duo.  Gerrard is renowned for singing in Glossolalia, an evocative expression of emotion through voice that has no defined language.  Gerrard has stated in interviews she feels language to be too restrictive, and Glossolalia to be a more authentic expression that communicates to all who listen, regardless of language or culture.  Her songs are ephemeral, haunting, and painfully beautiful.

Perry grounds DCD with his solemn vocals and introspective lyrics. Many of his songs originate from centuries-old ballads, reliving the struggles humans have endured in love, loss and that ceaseless search for meaning and purpose. “We are ancient, as ancient as the sun.  We came from the ocean, once our ancestral home,” sings Perry in one of their latest songs, “Children of the Sun.”

The show opened with DCD percussionist David Kuckhermann sitting alone on stage.  On his lap was a mysterious-looking instrument called a hang.  Created in Bern, Switzerland, the instrument consists of two large metal bowls sealed together.  Kuckhermann would strike the top side with his hand, producing different tones depending on where he hit the pitted surface.  The hang was tuned to a specific eight-tone scale.  The audience grew overwhelmingly quiet as he played, the single percussion instrument filling the entire auditorium with eerie, otherworldly music.

Soon the entire band took to the stage and the crowd was on their feet, cheering before the first note was played.  DCD opened with songs from their latest album, Perry’s voice booming through the theater just as strong and stirring as it was thirty-one years ago.

The energy of the fans (mostly the older fans) swelled when DCD began playing pieces from their previous albums.  The celebrated song “Rakim” began with Gerrard playing the yang-ch’in: a stringed instrument of Chinese origin in which padded bamboo sticks are used to strike a series of strings corresponding to specific scales.  Perry accompanied the yang-ch’in with his own Glossolalia.

As the concert moved forward, the music stirred many audience members out of their seats, several finding their way to the back of the auditorium to dance.  Others leaned forward in their chairs, closing their eyes and allowing the music to saturate the senses.  A few even wiped away lingering tears from wet cheeks.

The Latin phrase Tempus Fugit (time flies) was analogous to the audience’s experience.  Almost too quickly the entire theater stood and applauded as the band left the stage.  But as the auditorium remained dark, the adoration only grew louder and more intense.  Soon DCD returned, Perry signing a fan favorite, “The Ubiquitous Mr. Lovegrove” with the sound of sitars weaving through his dynamic vocals.   Still, the crowd was insatiable and cheered after another exit of the band.  And then another, Gerrard returning for the third encore with her mesmerizing voice accompanied only by a keyboard player.

At the end of the concert, though Gerrard’s voice could carve canyons with its intensity and precision, she quietly leaned forward into the microphone, whispering a thank you to the audience, followed by “you are all beautiful.”

ImageAnastasis is fitting lexicon not just for the new album but for the entire concert experience.  Coming from the Greek word meaning resurrection, DCD brought to life long forgotten music and ancient instruments from all over the world, bringing with them the spirits of those musicians who lived and died centuries before Denver was even a city.

And in the back of the Buell Theater, where audience members stood and sang and danced, you could see the dead dancing right along with them.

The Dreaded E-Word

As many of you already know, the word epic is used far too often.  And not just in metal reviews.  Some examples you might hear are as follows:

TV Commercial:  “If you’re thirsty, try (insert shitty sugary sports drink here) to quench that epic thirst!”

Movie Review:  “Bruce Willis stood in front of the White House in a torn, bloody t-shirt while firing machine guns and bazookas in slow motion with explosions raining down all around him as terrorists were being blown away by the dozens.  It was fucking epic!”

A Friend:  “So then, we go to (his or her) place and start having sex on the kitchen counter, and (he or she) pulls out this epic glass dildo from the cupboard!”

As Islander has lamented in previous posts, the word epic has proliferated metal blogs to the point that its overuse has the opposite effect.  Epic now equals insipid.  Superficial.  Commonplace.  I become very skeptical about an album when I see it in a review.  I can’t help but think it’s being used to compensate for music that’s just plain bad.  Or maybe the author of the review was just too tired after a long day at work and passed out at the desk looking for a thesaurus.  (I’ve been there.)

This is unfortunate.  Because there are a few bands out there who are epic.  There are a few albums that are epic.  Even a few songs.

The first time I listened to the song Crimson by Edge of Sanity, epic was the first word that came to mind.  Holy fucking shit! were the next three words that came to mind.  When the song ended, I just came.

To begin, there are some talented fucking musicians at the helm:  Dan Swanö and Mikael Åkerfeldt.  Those names alone should give you a raging boner, and an idea of the professionalism and epic talent behind the music.

Shit.  I used the e-word.  Awesome talent?  No.  Massive talent?  Meh.  That works.  I’m tired.  Next paragraph.

Crimson is forty minutes long.  A one-song album.  When any song runs longer than the average television show, a number of assumptions might be made:  The song contains tasteless, long-winded solos that are less about art and expression and more about the musicians showing off.  The riffs become mind-numbingly repetitive.  There are probably large sections of creepy ambient noise and samples from bad horror movies linking transitions in the song to add to its length.

Crimson avoids such pitfalls, keeping the listener engaged form the beginning, punching you in the throat right at the start.  A nice pace is established as the song vacillates between well-placed clean vocals and growls.  The song develops not unlike a caterpillar morphing into a beautiful butterfly—an evil fucking butterfly that will chew out your eyes as you scream helplessly, your muscles paralyzed from the venom which digests your flesh just before its slurped up by the insect.

Anyway, as you listen to the song, you get the sense that you’re part of some epi – . . . part of some legendary struggle.  Maybe fighting alongside Ghangis Kahn’s army as you clash with the soldiers of Vlad the Impaler in a macabre orgy of death to determine the fate of all mankind.

Which isn’t too far from the truth.  Crimson is a concept album, the lyrics outlining the narrative of a future kingdom in which the human race is fading away.  Bearing a child has, for some unknown reason, become impossible.  The king of this vanishing empire dies.  Then there’s a successor.  The successor is challenged.  Battles.  Bloodshed.  Betrayals.  A single miracle child.  Malevolent deities drinking the blood of men.  Reminds me of a Greek tragedy.  Only with really loud guitars and very angry actors growling out their lines.

There’s even a section where the dead king returns as a ghost urging his dejected soldiers to fight on, Dan’s voice layered in this ethereal reverb that punctuates the scene nicely.

Even the artwork on the cover of Crimson is epi—. . . remarkable.  Duncan C. Storr draws a surreal, psychedelic chamber of stasis pods that contain the leaders of the kingdom.  They have been frozen until a resolution to the impending doom can be found.

Doom.  Almost as bad as the word epic.  How about the word calamity?  Impending calamity.  That works.  Next paragraph.

It’s important to note that Crimson was recorded in 1996.  This was before the popularity of “progressive” metal was as it is today.  Take just about any current band that combines growls with clean vocals and you can hear the similarities.

Like any good story, the song unfolds naturally like acts in a play.  By the time it comes to an end, the body count is enormous.  The future kingdom lies in ruins.  But it has been saved by a brave few . . . sort of.  I won’t spoil the ending.  Just know that your brain will be mush from banging your head so hard for so long.

There is art.  And there is exceptional art.  Crimson certainly falls in the latter category.  (Its sequel, Crimson II, is an excellent follow up, but lacks the authority of its predecessor).  So, I argue that Crimson reclaims the power and substance behind the word epic.  Conquers it, really.  Dismembers the word and bashes your skull in with the bloody limbs—and it does this for forty epic minutes.

Note:  The word epic is used fourteen times in this review.  The irony is palpable.

Agalloch: Marrow of Denver’s Spirit


It was just after 5pm, and I was pacing back and forth in my apartment, trying to watch a movie.  The concert didn’t start until 8pm, and I was attempting to exercise some patience.  Then I thought to myself:  “Fuck patience.  And fuck exercise, too!”  I grabbed my ticket, some cash for swag, and my ID.  I ran out the door, jogging (not walking) towards the theater where Agalloch was going to play.

Normally I wouldn’t stand in line for two-and-a-half hours to see a concert.  Now days I’m more content to hang back and enjoy the music with a cold beer in my hand.  But Agalloch isn’t just some nominal band rolling through town, and this wasn’t going to be just another show.

The concert was at Denver’s Bluebird Theater.  An official historical landmark, the brick building is one year shy of being a century old.  It was once a movie house, and its maximum capacity is only 500.  This creates an intimate atmosphere between the crowd and the band.  Best of all, it’s only a fifteen minute walk from my apartment.

There were only a few people at the door when I arrived.  We chatted about metal, memorable concerts (mine was Depeche Mode at Red Rocks), and how this was the first time any of us were going to see Agalloch live.  Soon I saw Aesop Dekker and Don Anderson walk out the front, lighting up cigarettes, though they kept their distance from the growing line of fans.

The doors opened at 7pm, and I made my way to the front of the theater.  I snapped a few pictures of the interior architecture:  Tall marble columns and long, flowing crimson curtains along the walls.  Between the columns were bowl-shaped light fixtures with intricate designs carved into their surfaces.  Mounted to the front of each fixture was what looked like a demon mask—white faces with malevolent smiles and black holes for eyes.  Something a shaman would wear from some ancient, forgotten civilization to frighten off disease.

The band Velnias from Boulder, Colorado took to the stage first.  They reminded me of Morgion, with slow, doomish tempos building and growing until a fortification of frenzied black sound came crashing down on our headbanging heads, pulverizing the skulls of the hapless crowd with primal screams, explosive riffs and devastating drum beats.

Taurus followed, slowing things down with muddy, morose guitar playing.  Guttural screams pushed against the walls from the throat of the female lead singer, punctuated with frantic, feral drum fills.  I feared the drummer’s body would fly apart as she played, her performance reminding me of Animal from the Muppets (which is a huge fucking complement).

Finally it was time.  Smoke and darkness rolled onto the stage as John Haughm came out holding a single candle.  The entire theater grew quiet, and I swear those pagan masks turned their faces toward the front as Haughm lit the signature incense that starts each show, the soft light from the candle illuminating his face with a soft orange glow.

The aroma filled the air: rustic, saccharine, earthy.  Soon the rest of the band members donned their gear, and the opening riff to “Limbs” spilled out of the large speakers.

Being a former drummer, I watched Dekker closely.  His performance was flawless and intimidating.  Though he was tucked away in the back of the stage, his volatile drumming carried through the venue, threatening to knock over those marble columns.

They played their latest song, “Faustian Echoes,” and the horde became unglued, starting a short-lived mosh pit before the song slowed.  You’d swear Agalloch sold their own souls to Mephistopheles to play so brutally and beautifully at the same time.

One of my favorites followed, “Bloodbirds.”  That eerie lead guitar winding its way through the percussion and bass as Haughm screamed into the microphone, “the god of man is a failure!”

To everyone’s elation, Agalloch played several pieces from Pale Folklore and The Mantle.  When “In the Shadow of Our Pale Companion” filled the auditorium, I tried to film the performance with my phone.  But at around the 11:30 mark, the band members become blurred images in the clip as I slammed my head forward.

And I swear those pagan masks on the walls were doing the same.

Agalloch has a reputation for putting on a memorable show, and their first concert in Denver was no exception–superlative, vicious, august.

When it came to an end, the multitude screamed for an encore, but the lights stayed on.  I blame the high altitude with its thin air, because the crowed was ravenous for more.  We would have stayed for another set.  Two sets.  The rest of the fucking week.

Before I left The Bluebird, with ears ringing, I bought a t-shirt with the lyrics to “Black Lake Nidstag” printed on the back.  Then I bought a second t-shirt referencing “Faustian Echoes.”  Then an Agalloch patch.

Then I ran out of the theater before I emptied out my bank account paying homage to these pagan metal deities who descended upon the mile-high city and were made flesh, gracing for one night a hand-full of fanatical Coloradans with their Cthulhu-like providence.

A Citadel Called Morgion

It was a small music store tucked into the side of an outdoor malljust south of Hill Air Force Base, Utah.  I was flipping through a stack of used CDs (remember CDs?) and found this subtle yet intriguing album cover.  It had a hand-drawn picture of a solar eclipse with a diagram of our solar system labeled in Latin.

I sat on a small stool near the cashier, sticking the disk into their CD player.  I pulled the headphones over my head and pushed play.  A sense of gloom coiled itself tightly around my body, and I couldn’t help but smile.
Listening to Morgion’s Solinari is a bit like being dragged slowly out of a bog just before you’re pulled under.  As you lay on the ground gasping for air, your faceless rescuer comforts you withsluggish tempos, mournful whispers and haunting keys.

Then the tempo quickens.  Guitars grow loud and angry.  The whispers mutate into indignant growls.  You watch helplessly as your rescuer picks up a large rock with both hands.  The music surges to its apex, and the rock comes crashing down on your chest over and over until it breaks through your ribcage.

The music then subsides.  Acoustic guitars fill the void, and your rescuer tosses your broken body back into the bog, watching silently as it sinks beneath the surface.

It was the first time I heard doom/death metal.  I found a bastion.  A medium to purge the past.

Almost ten years earlier I stood next to my older brother in our backyard.  The sun was sitting comfortably in a naked sky.  Not a cloud to be seen.  The wind blew hard as my mom dug a small hole.  My brother was visibly annoyed, but he knew better than to say anything.

She gathered all of my brother’s cassette tapes into a pile. (Remember tapes?)  Then my mom set them in the pit, coated them with lighter fluid and lit a match.  As the music of Def Leppard, Huey Lewis, and a smattering of 80’s hair bands melted beneath dancing flames, my mom told us how she was clearing the house of demons, something her church told her she had an obligation to God to do.

I was young, incredibly naive, and eager for my mom’s approval.  I became convinced Satan was ensconced in secular music and vowed never to listen to it—not even the radio.

But the metal bug had already hatched in my brain and was eating its way through my temporal lobe, laying eggs along the way.

I started listening to Christian metal bands.  To my surprise, my mom didn’t care (as long as it was Christian music).  But the teachers at the religious school I attended told me electric guitars were instruments of the Devil—that I should burn my albums.  I went out and bought more.

Then I graduated high school and joined the Air Force—escaping home and the church. I gave away all my Christian CDs, looking for something which reflected my anger at a church telling mothers to burn their kids’ music.  My frustration at having to remain in the closet because of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.  My despondency that I was stupid enough to believe Beelzebub lived inside a compact disk packed with digital data.

When I listened to Morgion for the first time, I found salvation in the very music I was taught would damn me forever to perdition.

I went back to that store knowing next-to-nothing about the metal.  But those eggs embedded in my brain began to hatch.  Emperor’s IX Equilibrium: A wall of swinging sledgehammers that pulverizes your bones into a fine powder (used by Ihsahn to season his meals).  Daemonarch’s Hermeticum:  Infectious riffs and guitar solos that jab at your ears just before Fernando Ribeiro’s vocals claw your face from your skull.

I couldn’t listen to those albums enough.  Some of the airmen I worked with cringed when I played them in the shop.  One guy refused to carpool with me after Morgion’s “Nightfall Infernal” bellowed out of my truck’s speakers at top volume.

My brain is now a festering, writhing swarm of metal.  A pulsating hive spawned by an innocuous death/doom metal album sitting in a small music store in Utah.

Check out the song below.  Sinking slowly into a bog with a large hole in your chest never felt so fucking great.